Bridge of the Gods

Oregon
Payment options*
  • Uproad
  • Cash
  • Transponder
Toll pricing
  • Consistent
  • Varies w/traffic volume
  • Higherat peak hours
Rules of the (toll) road
  • Express toll lanes
  • High-occupancy toll lane

*Drivers without a valid payment option get a mailed bill or violation and pay the highest toll rate.

Additional Information

PLEASE NOTE: Many toll roads have discontinued cash payments. If you must travel regularly, download the Uproad app, and by the next day, you'll pay tolls with your phone. Stay safe.

Supported transpondersBreezeBy
Coordinates45.6623; -121.9011

Toll prices, costs, & payment options

* Click on the map to see traffic conditions

Map of Bridge of the Gods Oregon

The Details

Bridge of the Gods Oregon is a fully paid bridge over the Columbia River. It connects SR-14 in Washington and I-84 in Oregon. The bridge is located 64 kilometers east of Portland, Oregon, and 6 kilometers upriver from Bonneville Dam.

In 1920, the US War Department issued an order to build a bridge. By 1925, only one pier had been built. The entire bridge was built by the Wauna Toll Bridge Company in 1926.

Bridge of the Gods Oregon is operated by Port of Cascade Locks. In addition to cars, pedestrians and cyclists move along the bridge - there are special paths.

Interesting facts about the bridge

The bridge was named after historical and geological features. The Pacific Trail crosses the Columbia River on the Bridge of the Gods Oregon. It is worth noting that the lowest point of the trail is located just on the bridge.

The bridge also carries the scenic 2,660-mile Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) from the US-Mexico border to the US-Canada border. Every year, this trail is visited by tens of thousands of tourists from all over the world.

The Bridge of the Gods Oregon gained wide acclaim in 2015 when it was used for the filming of the movie Wild, starring Reese Witherspoon. Popularity contributed to an increase in traffic, and as a result, fares increased. The film “Wild” was created based on the work of the same name by the author Cheryl Strayed. The Bridge of the Gods Oregon is one of the three oldest crossings built across the Columbia River.

In 1953, the Columbia River Bridge Company purchased the bridge for $735,000, and since 1961 it has been owned by Port of Cascade Locks, which bought the Bridge of the Gods Oregon for $950,000 in government bonds.

Technical parameters of the bridge of the Gods Oregon

The original length was 344 m. However, in 1938 the bridge was extended by 13 m due to the increase in river levels after the completion of the Bonneville Dam. Now the length is 566 m. The longest span of the Bridge of the Gods Oregon is 215 m.

What people are saying

Alice B.
Love the app, use it every week
Romain F.
Saved our day when we were on a trip and had to take a toll road on our way home
Arlina W.
This App allows us worry-free travel on TOLL ROADS...Automatically replenishing our account, notifying us of Automatically paying our access to the Toll Road. Great relief from expensive citations for not paying while driving. Thank you. P.S. A receipt is always sent to us.
Endry B.
I find this app a good way to track my tolls and manage my budget. Works great for this.
Bertrand V.
The app saves me a ton extra minutes every day. Took the worry out of paying our tolls. Thank you🌴
Nicole B.
Better than a toll tag, I use one app on both vehicles and will link my wife's car next week. Easy to travel to other states, since you're registered with all toll authorities they cover.
Mathilde C.
Been going back to the office a little so been driving more. This is great.
Li Y.
Great app, awesome way to pay for tolls... thank you!
Wendy A.
This app is so easy to use, and I can travel without having to worry about missing tolls.

Toll prices, costs, & payment options

* Click on the map to see traffic conditions

Map of Bridge of the Gods Oregon

The Details

Bridge of the Gods Oregon is a fully paid bridge over the Columbia River. It connects SR-14 in Washington and I-84 in Oregon. The bridge is located 64 kilometers east of Portland, Oregon, and 6 kilometers upriver from Bonneville Dam.

In 1920, the US War Department issued an order to build a bridge. By 1925, only one pier had been built. The entire bridge was built by the Wauna Toll Bridge Company in 1926.

Bridge of the Gods Oregon is operated by Port of Cascade Locks. In addition to cars, pedestrians and cyclists move along the bridge - there are special paths.

Interesting facts about the bridge

The bridge was named after historical and geological features. The Pacific Trail crosses the Columbia River on the Bridge of the Gods Oregon. It is worth noting that the lowest point of the trail is located just on the bridge.

The bridge also carries the scenic 2,660-mile Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) from the US-Mexico border to the US-Canada border. Every year, this trail is visited by tens of thousands of tourists from all over the world.

The Bridge of the Gods Oregon gained wide acclaim in 2015 when it was used for the filming of the movie Wild, starring Reese Witherspoon. Popularity contributed to an increase in traffic, and as a result, fares increased. The film “Wild” was created based on the work of the same name by the author Cheryl Strayed. The Bridge of the Gods Oregon is one of the three oldest crossings built across the Columbia River.

In 1953, the Columbia River Bridge Company purchased the bridge for $735,000, and since 1961 it has been owned by Port of Cascade Locks, which bought the Bridge of the Gods Oregon for $950,000 in government bonds.

Technical parameters of the bridge of the Gods Oregon

The original length was 344 m. However, in 1938 the bridge was extended by 13 m due to the increase in river levels after the completion of the Bonneville Dam. Now the length is 566 m. The longest span of the Bridge of the Gods Oregon is 215 m.

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Frequently asked questions

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